How To…

HowToWriteGood

I think I am most fond of Be More or Less Specific, Yes I think I like that one best, maybe.

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8 thoughts on “How To…

  1. Great post, to an extent. I agree with all except number six and number eight. Those two are necessary components in fiction. An editorial note:

    Making Comparisons—Simile and Metaphor in Fiction

    on June 6th, 2012 by Fiction Editor Beth Hill and last modified on June 6, 2012
    Simile and metaphor are figures of speech, phrases given new meaning because the words are being used in an unusual or non-literal way.

    They are often found in poetry, but they can be both beautiful and powerful when used in fiction.

    A quick review—

    A simile is a comparison between things. The words like or as are often part of the simile. The comparison is clearly stated, but there is no assertion that one of the things is the other.

    Her tenderness fell on me like the first rain of the season.

    The baby’s cry was as loud as a siren.

    A metaphor is a comparison that asserts that one of the things being compared is the other thing, even though we know that such is not literally true.

    My lover is a god, invincible and powerful.

    Cancer was a prison, holding her in isolation.

    We could go into more detail, look at other figures of speech, but my purpose here is not to define simile and metaphor, but to suggest ways to use them in your stories.

  2. I love these mini posters that try to take the Micky out of so-called grammar rules by highlighting or exaggerating them (rather like a slap in the face with a wet fish) 🙂

    • I think so… 🙂
      Alliterations are also great, when you combine 2/3 or more languages, to express something you should not, something you don’t want people to understand, to express some “misundestanding”,…

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